Open source reporting on projects

Last Wednesday, I had the opportunity to travel again with Green Empowerment and check out the water project in progress in the community of Suro Antivo. Through a combination of municipal and foundation funds, the small collection of houses is finally going to receive safe and reliable water access to their households. To date, most families have to get their water from unimproved sources. There are two tanks being built, and one being refurbished, which will supply water to each house through a gravity-fed system:

Under Construction

Old and new

 

 

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On the ground MobilizeMRS Research

Thursday morning, Wayne, Karen, and I went down to the clinic in Arequipa to discuss OpenMRS, FrontlineSMS, and MobilizeMRS with Lilia, the director of the clinic, and Maris, the assistant director of the clinic. There were a few goals to the meeting: understand the rudimentary electronic medical records system (EMR or MRS) in place now, assess the pros and cons of that system vs. OpenMRS, and discuss the possibility of running a clinic efficiency experiment with FrontlineSMS. We got through the first two agenda items pretty well but, being on Peruvian time, didn’t make it very far into the third.

Brain and note taking dump ahead.

The clinic has an EMR at the moment which is very limited. It was developed by a local programmer they still have good relations with and, every time they want expanded functionality, they just ask he (or she) to build it. Furthermore, the clinic staff has been talking over the last year about different ways to expand the tools. At the moment, it captures data about the patient, vital signs, and has a free text area for diagnoses. Continuing development on this software will require significant money, of course, which is why OpenMRS is probably a better long term option. Writing software for a pretty common use case doesn’t make much sense when there are customizable open source options available. Thanks to a relatively fast internet connection today, I was able to upload a HD walkthrough of their current EMR:

Tour of the clinic’s custom EMR from Daniel Bachhuber on Vimeo.

One fairly significant problem we faced Thursday morning, however, was trying to convince the clinic staff of the merits of OpenMRS without a full featured online demo or video tutorials. I personally haven’t experimented with the software very much, nor do I know all of the useful components of a medical records system, so I couldn’t necessarily sell the software with my salesmanship.

Wayne, being proactive, took the conversation from step zero so that Lilia and Maris would be able to help assess the merits and demerits of their current system:

Basic needs of a Medical Records System from Daniel Bachhuber on Vimeo.

According to the doctor, the basic needs of a medical records system are three-fold:

  1. Documentation – an EMR should have the ability to take notes and capture information on labs, Rx, Dx imaging, etc. Most importantly, this information should be searchable.
  2. Networking –  an EMR should lend accessible communication, both internally (within the clinic) and externally.
  3. Decision support – an EMR should be intelligent, and assist the clinic staff in identifying high-risk patients, etc.

Once we had these criteria established, we started talking about the pros and cons of using their current system.

Pros and cons of the current system

The pros of their system are:

  • Easy implementation – the software is already installed on the computer and they know how to use it.
  • Design specific to clinic – they can choose how they want the software to operate because they direct the development of it.
  • Know[n] commodity – they know what they’re dealing with.
  • Personal sw. provider – the developer is local and can come to the clinic to provide support, etc.
  • Economically speaking + impact – Cheap for what it does.

The cons of their system are:

  • Design specific – the design of the software is tied very much to the needs of their clinic today, and not five years in the future.
  • Expandability – uncertain as to how difficult it is to extend the system.
  • $ for upgrades – have to pay to have the developer build every single upgrade. Also, only the developer knows how to build or maintain the system.
  • Don’t really know “OpenMRS” – don’t have the proper education materials to illustrate the power and flexibility of OpenMRS.

The unfortunate thing is that their current system doesn’t match up to the needs of an EMR very well. As it stands, it’s not much more than a data storage tool. They use it to house basic information about the patient, symptoms, and diagnosis, but it isn’t very useful as a tool to manipulate the information. On top of that, the networking support (connecting computers in the reception with those in the doctor’s rooms and farmacia), has yet to be built and decision support is cost ineffective.

The clinic is interested in OpenMRS, however. On Monday or Tuesday, Wayne will be showing Lilia and Maris a demonstration of the EMR he uses back in the States. This will ideally convince them of the practicality of having a robust EMR. We’d also like to get them to a clinic in Peru that has a working demo of OpenMRS soon. If this proves feasible, then we might be able to send the programmer they have to an implementer’s training with PIH.

A thought on bringing the programmer into the fold: this might actually be an economic enterprise for him or her. My thinking is that there are a number of clinics in Arequipa still using paper records, so if the clinic HBI works with becomes a local model for using OpenMRS, then that might get the other clinics interested in medical records and incentivize the developer to get to know OpenMRS better.

In the interim, though, the clinic will still put a bit more money into the system they already have.

On the note of SMS, we discussed the possibility of how mobile might be useful to increase clinic efficiency:

Day seven, Arequipa from Daniel Bachhuber on Vimeo.

The idea wasn’t very well received, though, because the assumption is that the demographic that the clinic serves most likely will not have cell phones, and the clinic staff couldn’t really understand how the technology could be useful. Anecdotally, however, a doctor said the penetration of mobiles in this market is near or over 90%, a statistic which doesn’t seem too unrealistic to me. Furthermore, I think that mobiles could play a significant role in improving the efficiency of the clinic.

We’ve got an experiment cooking too. Building upon the pediatric idea briefly outlined in my previous post, we’d like to have a control group, an experimental group which receives a reminder for their appointment, and another experiment where the group receives a unique code for a discount on their appointment. In preparation, the clinic will start collecting cellphone numbers at registration. Ideally, this experiment will be later this spring or early in the summer.

One last thought on efficiency: we’d also like to run a two week experiment (probably in February) where patients receive a time-stamp upon checking in to the clinic, and another one when the doctor takes them for their appointment. I think mobile could a tremendous impact on the clinic’s ability to efficiently deliver healthcare (the concept of being on-time for appointments is nearly zero), but baseline numbers will be really important to calculate impact.

First stage of MobilizeMRS research

Day one in Arequipa: asking as many questions as I possibly could about how Health Bridges International‘s partner clinic in Alta Cayma operates. This research will serve two purposes: extensive background for how MobilizeMRS might be useful, as well as assessing resources for intra-clinic collaboration. 

A little background. The catchment area for the clinic in Alta Cayma includes 30,000 to 35,000 people. From this population, the clinic saw 22,000 visits in the past year, with between 15,000 and 17,000 unique patients. Recorded number of visits to the clinic is increasing at a rate of 4,000/year. The clinic is pretty well resourced, according to Wayne of HBI, with a team of physicians (rotating 5, not all full time), dentists (2), nurses (9, not all full time), pharmacy (4), management (2), and two specialists, a psychologist and opthamologist. Essential medications are provided through a Catholic charity program and they can get most others through donations. Where the clinic lacks is primarily in specialization, health education, and patient care advocates.

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Striations of the city

Down the street

A view of the main street running down Alta Cayma. As the city grows, it expands outwards, and the distance from the center is a decent ruler for measuring socio-economic status. The houses, businesses, and infrastructure closer to the hub are significantly nicer than those in the periphery. Conversely, a view up the street running out of town (from a few blocks higher):

Up the street

Rural poor come to the city looking for new livelihoods, and the easiest place to start is on the outskirts of town.

Also, a wee little video of the same area.

My winter term

In about a half hour, I’m headed on Continental Flight 308 to Houston, hopefully ending up in Lima at some point tonight. The plan as it stands now is to spend two months in Peru enjoying the summer and working on a few different projects.

The first destination is Arequipa, in southern Peru, to do research for Health Bridges International (HBI) on how the clinics serving the Alto Cayma catchment area can better coordinate efforts, share resources, and work together. The specialty I hope to bring is identifying ways in which communications technology (like a Google Group, WordPress blog, or SMS) can enhance collaboration. Wayne and I worked on a questionnaire a while back that will be implemented at a healthcare providers conference on Monday and Tuesday. Here are some of the questions we’ll be asking:

  • What types of resources are you commonly lacking?
  • Do you have internet access?
  • Do check email regularly? How often?
  • Are you interested in collaborating with other local clinics/ organizations?
  • Would you be interested in sharing specialty consultations?
  • Would you be interested in sharing supplies or resources?

We’ll be trying to keep it short, but I’d enjoy any and all feedback on the questions we’re asking, as well as ideas on how to connect clinics with limited resources.

Along with doing research for HBI, I’ll be doing interviews to gather information for MobilizeMRS, a project with Isaac Holeman and (hopefully) Lewis & Clark Direct Action. These interviews, which will probably be video too, will try to deduce:

  • A solid use case for FrontlineSMS in the HBI clinic in Arequipa
  • What different stakeholders think the project can do
  • The organization of the community health workers network
  • # of trips made per day by community health workers + doctors, average distance of each trip, and how they travel
  • Access to electricity

Thanks to Josh Nesbit for feedback on the scope of this research.

At the end of January, I’ll be headed to Cajamarca to work on Oregon Direct Action’s water project in San Pablo, Peru.

More soon, I promise. Final boarding time now. If you’re going to down there at the same time, hit me up. I think I’d like to do a few weekend trips to get away from work. And an FYI for those of you that follow me on Twitter: I hope to tweet as I’m traveling around. Twitter no longer delivers international SMS, however, so the conversation might seem a bit one-sided at times. My apologies in advance.

Onward!

Mobilizing Mobile Records makes It to round two

Amy Sample Ward just alerted me that “Mobilizing Mobile Records in Resource Poor Settings“, a project Isaac and I pitched for the NetSquared/USAID Development 2.0 Challenge, has made it into the top 15

Wow. So sweet. I’m not entirely sure what the next steps are, but this is a huge stride forward for bridging the gap between SMS and OpenMRS and empowering healthcare providers.