Help with the Gutenberg Migration Guide at WCEU

This was originally posted on make.wordpress.org/hosting.

Looking for something to do at Contributor Day? We could use your help!

The Gutenberg Migration Guide is a crowdsourcing project to document WordPress Classic Editor customization points and their Gutenberg equivalents (if such exist). media_buttons is the quintessential example; whereas you might’ve used this action previously in the Classic Editor to register a button, it no longer exists in Gutenberg and the block inserter is its direct equivalent.

We want the migration guide to be as comprehensive as it can be. This is defined as:

  1. Identifying as many integration points as we can find. For instance, there are already 14 actions / filters listed. Some are commonly used, while others are not. As long as we have a good example for how the integration point is used, it makes sense to include in the guide.
  2. Whenever possible, documenting how feature parity can be achieved with Gutenberg. Some integration points do already have Gutenberg equivalents. Others don’t yet, and that’s alright.

You can help make the migration guide more comprehensive. If you don’t have any examples of your own to include, here are a couple of places you can start looking:

Everyone can contribute to the migration guide, regardless of skill set. All you need to do is open a new GitHub issue and report the incompatibility you’ve found. Screenshots and GIFs are tremendously helpful. If you know the underlying problem, then please include that too. If all you know is that a given plugin’s feature doesn’t work in Gutenberg, no worries; simply open an issue and we can help track down the cause. Identifying examples of breakage are what we need help with most.

Feel free to join #hosting-community in the WordPress.org Slack if you have any questions, etc. Thanks for your help!

High value Gutenberg issues

Want to have a huge impact on Gutenberg’s rollout to a larger number of users? Here are some high value issues that would benefit from a pull request over the next week:

Read through the contributing guide for details on how to get started. Feel free to ask questions on the specific issue, or join us in the #core-editor channel with any questions you might have.

Daniel’s rules for travel

Drafted last time I flew and to be revised next time.

  • Board the plane last, to maximize your use of airport wifi and minimize sitting in the plane seat.
  • Walk everywhere you can, because you’re probably sitting otherwise. If the opportunity comes up to walk two miles to your next destination, take it without hesitation.
  • Drink water at every opportunity. You are more likely to get dehydrated while traveling, and dehydration can ruin your trip.
  • Minimize alcohol and sugar consumption. The golden amount is zero / zero. If you need to consume one, you’ll probably want alcohol for the social occasions over sugar.
  • TSA Pre is the easiest way to not hate the airport. I’m typically through a security checkpoint in under two minutes.
  • Bring lunch from home for your first day of travel. If possible, also bring non-perishable snacks from home for throughout the trip.

Memorial Day marathon

Not quite, but almost.

Ava, current and future Spray Rodeo princess

On Saturday, I ran the Spray Half to the tune of 1:48:22.

It was a great event and I was really happy with my performance. Notably, I hit faster and faster splits in the last five miles: 8:19 (mile 9), 8:02 (mile 10), 7:44 (mile 11), 7:51 (mile 12), and 7:23 (mile 13).

We left Spray on Sunday but we weren’t done yet.

Leah and Charlie walking the shores of Timothy Lake.

On Monday, Leah and I subjected Ava and Charlie to a grueling ~14 mile hike around Timothy Lake.

For better or for worse, this is the epitome of our marriage — “should we turn around now?” is left unanswered and we keep going. Fortunately, our kids are more hardcore than we are.

An A+ Memorial Day weekend for the year in review book.

Four short links – May 11, 2018

ADU legislation, pro-housing density efforts, software eats retail, and PDX exploring.

  1. ADU Legislative Initiatives Abound (Kol Peterson) — While Senate Bill 1051 is requires all cities to “allow ADUs”, the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development guidance recommends dropping owner occupancy requirements, dropping off street parking requirements, allowing detached ADUs up to 800 sq ft by right, and even allowing two ADUs.
  2. ‘My Generation Is Never Going to Have That’ (POLITICO)— Pro-housing density efforts in Seattle from the affected tech population. See also Jeff Kaufman (Boston) and Kevin Burke (California).
  3. Mickey Drexler and the death of a supply-driven world (Loose Threads) — Software eats retail: how J.Crew, Gap, Ralph Lauren, Abercrombie & Fitch, American Apparel, and others were blindsided by technology.
  4. Pedaling from Portland to Hood River (Bike Portland) — Neat 100 mile bike route off the beaten path.

Getting your site ready for Gutenberg

Still need guidance getting your site ready for Gutenberg?

On Tuesday, June 5th at 10 am PT, I’m heading up a webinar with Pantheon to cover how you can get your site ready. More specifically, we’ll cover:

But wait, there’s more! The webinar is just one in a series of five, including Mel Choyce and Josh Pollock. You should sign up so Tessa and I aren’t terribly lonely on June 5th.

Gutenberg and the REST API, early May

This post originally appeared on make.wordpress/core.

Since I last wrote two weeks ago, we’re making progress! Key achievements for Gutenberg and the REST API include:

  • Support for who=authors was added to GET wp/v2/users, making it possible to accurately query for authors. WordPress, for better or for worse, defines an author as user_level!=0. See WordPress/gutenberg#6361 for the context on why we can’t add this logic client-side (#42202 for WordPress 4.9.6).
  • Improved performance for the _fields= query parameter (e.g. GET wp/v2/pages?_fields=id,title) by ensuring WordPress core will only process the fields requested for the response. Notably, this helps us avoid running the_content when we don’t need to be (#43874 for WordPress 4.9.7).
  • Minor enhancements to reflect existing WordPress behaviors:

The “Merge Proposal: REST API” GitHub milestone represents the distance we still need to close. Slowly, steadily, we’re bridging the gap, but we could use your help. Here are some of the issues we’re still working through:

  • To ensure all necessary data is available to Gutenberg, we’ve settled upon permitting unbounded per_page=-1 REST API requests for authorized users. This landed for GET wp/v2/users (WordPress/gutenberg#6627), is in-progress for GET wp/v2/(pages|blocks) (WordPress/gutenberg#6657), and needs to be addressed for categories, tags, and custom taxonomies. We also need to patch core with this enhancement (#43998 for WordPress 4.9.7?)
  • Capabilities can’t be processed directly client-side (WordPress/gutenberg#6361), so we’ve introduced a new targetSchema concept to communicate which actions a user can perform. See it in action with wp:action-sticky (WordPress/gutenberg#6529) and wp:action-assign-author (WordPress/gutenberg#6630). There are a few other actions we will need to work out, and then we’ll need to patch core (no ticket yet).
  • Adam is putting together an improved autosaves implementation (WordPress/gutenberg#6257) that I literally cannot wait to see complete. I’m sure he could use some help testing in the near future.
  • Felix is implementing a WP_REST_Search_Controller endpoint (WordPress/gutenberg#6489) to power the link search UI.

Join us tomorrow, Thursday, May 10 at 17:00 UTC in #core-restapi office hours if you’d like to chat through any questions you have.

Welcome Back to the Village

Strava is a social network, but you can pay for premium features. When someone asks me, “Is paying Strava worth it? What premium features do you like?” I answer, “I could care less about the premium features. I need Strava to exist.”

While the value that Strava the social network provides me is undeniable, Strava creates another construct. The humans who choose to be there are bound together by a shared purpose that I see each time I ride my bike. I often stop at the side of the road and get off my bike for a quick drink or bite. As other bikers pass, it is normal for total strangers to stop their ride and ask, “Hey are you ok?”

See, Strava built a village.

Michael Lopp – Rands in Repose