Are the WP REST API endpoints ready for core?

The proposal by the team was to include the 4 content endpoints when they are ready. We had a lengthly overview as to the progress of those endpoints, more details on what we feel is left to be done can be seen at https://github.com/wp-api/wp-api/issues?q=is%3Aopen+is%3Aissue+milestone%3A2.0

Why these endpoints specifically? Because they are co-dependent for the most part. Shipping Posts without support for Taxonomies would not be that useful.

Going for development of _all_ functionality (somewhere around 8-10 total data routes) should not be underestimated. It’s taken somewhere around a year and a half to get the current 4 to where they are now, and that was with 2 years prior art from Version 1.

As someone who has been in the weeds of that implementation for a while now, I cannot over over-stress just how tricky trying to retrofit a consistent, coherent interface on 13 years of organically grown code and ideas can become. I’m looking forward to being part of the writing the implementation for the remaining (and majority) of functionality, however I don’t want to stop users and developers benefitting from what is already being built for another [several] years.

Joe Hoyle — WordPress Contributors Look for a Path Forward for the WP REST API

Heisenberg Developers

Finely grained management of software developers is compelling to a business. Any organization craves control. We want to know what we are getting in return for those expensive developer salaries. We want to be able to accurately estimate the time taken to deliver a system in order to do an effective cost-benefit analysis and to give the business an accurate forecast of delivery. There’s also the hope that by building an accurate database of estimates verses actual effort, we can fine tune our estimation, and by analysis find efficiencies in the software development process.

The problem with this approach is that it fundamentally misunderstands the nature of software development. That it is a creative and experimental process. Software development is a complex system of multiple poorly understood feedback loops and interactions. It is an organic process of trial and error, false starts, experiments and monumental cock-ups. Numerous studies have shown that effective creative work is best done by motivated autonomous experts. As developers we need to be free to try things out, see how they evolve, back away from bad decisions, maybe try several different things before we find one that works. We don’t have hard numbers for why we want to try this or that, or why we want to stop in the middle of this task and throw away everything we’ve done. We can’t really justify all our decisions, many them are hunches, many of them are wrong.

Mike Hadlow — Heisenberg Developers