Essays from Peter Thiel’s Stanford class on startups

Essays from Peter Thiel’s Stanford class on startups. In a nutshell, freely available material like this is why I am a college dropout. Every essay is worth reading — queue up your Pocket. I particularly appreciated this one on markets, competition, and monopolies. (via Spittle)

The Anti-Dropout

The Anti-Dropout. Two pieces: the technical problems of the next decade won’t be solved with knowledge that can be self-taught, and the next generation of innovation will come from large organizations where credentials matter.

Jason Glaspey: The Art of Tiny

Today I’m hanging out at Tiny Startup Camp, an uniquely Portland event. If Portland is the place young people go to retire, this is how they get paid. Jason Glaspey of Paleo Plan, and formerly Bacn, is kicking things off.

Minimum Viable Narrative

One startup in this class at PIE is KS12. As a creative studio, they’re breaking the mold of what you typically might see at a tech incubator. Plus, they’re powered by WordPress. Pretty neat.


Four years ago: Here’s the problem: I, like many people I know, drive too many places all alone in my car.  One person in a three ton metal vehicle that could easily transport five.  To move all of that mass around, with such unused, waste internal space, is an inefficient use of energy. Here’s one […]

Matt Haughey’s lessons from a 40 year old

I like to think of funded startups vs. bootstrapped web sites like the split between signed and unsigned bands. Think about what a band has to do if they sign with a major label. They write music, perform/record it, and play it. Now think about people like Prince, Aimee Mann, etc. that do every single […]