Webstock: Karen McGrane, Adapting Ourselves to Adaptive Content

This week I’m at Webstock, a lovely conference in New Zealand. I’m doing my best to write little blog posts about the amazing presentations. Please forgive any typos, etc. If you’re here too, come write a haiku at Automattic’s booth.

Karen McGrane has made a career of dragging media companies kicking and screaming onto the internet. She’s helped with projects like a redesigned NYTimes.com, Atlantic Media’s web properties, and TIME’s new responsive redesign. “It’s tempting to think that mobile is a design and development problem,” but the real challenge of mobile is content.

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Webstock: John Gruber, In Praise of Pac-Man

This week I’m at Webstock, a lovely conference in New Zealand. I’m doing my best to write little blog posts about the amazing presentations. Please forgive any typos, etc. If you’re here too, come write a haiku at Automattic’s booth.

John Gruber, well everyone knows who John Gruber is. If you don’t, please hand in your internet license.

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Webstock: Chris Coyier, The Modern Web Designer’s Workflow

This week I’m at Webstock, a lovely conference in New Zealand. I’m doing my best to write little blog posts about the amazing presentations. Please forgive any typos, etc. If you’re here too, come write a haiku at Automattic’s booth.

Chris Coyier is a humorous man. He was also a designer at Wufoo and now does CSS Tricks and CodePen. Today he’s covering:

  1. Getting started designing.
  2. Local development environment.
  3. Working on a team.
  4. Preprocessing saves happiness.
  5. Testing, testing, testing.
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Webstock: Miranda Mulligan, Your Survival is Designed

This week I’m at Webstock, a lovely conference in New Zealand. I’m doing my best to write little blog posts about the amazing presentations. Please forgive any typos, etc. If you’re here too, come write a haiku at Automattic’s booth.

Miranda Mulligan (hey, I know her!) helped take the Boston Globe through a responsive redesign, and now is Director at the Knight Media Lab at Northwestern. She’s the first in five generations of women to not make clothing for a living. Clothing matters; what you wear is an indicator of what you value.

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Webstock: Aza Raskin, Design is the Beauty of Turning Constraints Into Advantages

This week I’m at Webstock, a lovely conference in New Zealand. I’m doing my best to write little blog posts about the amazing presentations. Please forgive any typos, etc. If you’re here too, come write a haiku at Automattic’s booth.

For the last couple of years, Aza Raskin (@aza) has been working on helping bring design to solving health challenges. Solving difficult problems happens by changing how you ask the question. The big meta problem of design is figuring out how to ask the right question.

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Webstock: Jason Kottke, I Built a Web App (And You Can Too)

This week I’m at Webstock, a lovely conference in New Zealand. I’m doing my best to write little blog posts about the amazing presentations. Please forgive any typos, etc. If you’re here too, come write a haiku at Automattic’s booth.

Jason Kottke is a blogger and a web developer. Kottke.org is a blog he’s been publishing since 1998. Today he’s talking about something else.

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Webstock: Clay Johnson, Industrialized Ignorance

This week I’m at Webstock, a lovely conference in New Zealand. I’m doing my best to write little blog posts about the amazing presentations. Please forgive any typos, etc. If you’re here too, come write a haiku at Automattic’s booth.

Clay Johnson (@cjoh) started out with a comparison of knowledge. Most of the room knew the name of at least one Kardashian, but most didn’t know the child poverty rate in NZ. How can we build better communities if we don’t know these things?

In 2011, the obesity rates in America are so bad that they had to adjust the map for comparing states.

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#techrakingcir: The Future of the CMS

Today, I’m down at Google in Mountain View at Techraking, a gathering of technologists and investigative journalists. It’s been super inspiring because of the fresh to me perspectives — I’d love to help Portland media outlets with projects like those I’ve heard about.

At lunch, I learnt I was to lead a small group breakout on “the future of the CMS.” To keep the discussion going, we started out by brainstorming the things we liked and want to improve our respective software, and then did a roundtable to identify our six month personal goals.

Some things people like about their CMS:

  • Drupal done well is easy to use; there are a ton of modules
  • Affordability, open source is cheap
  • Community to work with
  • Many different homepage templates to choose from depending on the stories of the day

What people would like to improve (lots of conversation, as expected):

  • Data portability
  • More headless; produce output other than HTML
  • Scalability, faster when many people are working in the admin
  • Less steps for completing common, simple tasks
  • Integration with story budgeting, calendaring; API for story flow
  • Magical WYSIWYG editor; auto-save that works; track changes
  • Support structured data / semantic markup
  • Customization for story layout
  • Small pieces loosely joined; better integration with other services

Given the short notice, I thought the breakout session went quite well. About twenty people showed up. In terms of what worked:

  • Small group discussion; knew enough backgrounds to call out different people to talk
  • Noted salient points on the whiteboard as a way of plotting direction
  • I enjoyed the “what are you going to work on in the next six months” takeaways at the end

Next time, we should:

  • Figure out the location ahead of time so we don’t waste time finding it
  • Have people introduce themselves if they haven’t spoken yet
  • Every fifteen minutes, have something for everyone to participate in so people don’t check out

Upcoming talks: WordCamp Phoenix, PDXWP, and CMA NYC

Over the next couple of months, I’m looking forward to speaking at a few different events.

At WordCamp Phoenix on February 25th, I’m presenting “Mastering WordPress Development.” The title lends itself to a number of discussion topics, possibly including coding standards, how to perform migrations, writing bin scripts to manipulate lots of data, participating in open source projects, how to review your code, common mistakes we see at WordPress.com VIP, etc. If you have opinions as to what I should cover, I’d love to hear them in the comments.

On February 27th, Mike Bijon and I will be taking the Portland WordPress Users Group through using Git (and SVN) for version control and working within a team.

At CMA NYC March 18th through 20th, I’ll be leading three sessions (one per day):

  • “I Want To Learn WordPress – An Introduction To Key Concepts” – All of the basics you need to get started, including the WordPress interface and key concepts like themes, plugins, PHP and MySQL, and how to choose a good web host and design for your site.
  • “Hacking WordPress In The Newsroom” – How to take your WordPress development to the next level. We’ll review version control, coding standards, performance and optimization, debugging, and other best practices.
  • “Making The Switch To WordPress” – Everything you need to know about switching to WordPress from CMS X. Well, most everything.

Shaun, Erica, and I will also be hosting a mini-Happiness Bar for a few hours on Monday to help attendees with all of their WordPress questions.

Sweet!