Class: Blogging Best Practices, 4/25/11

Last night was the second of three Blogging Best Practices classes I’m teaching for the J-School. You can read my recap of the first class as a primer. Eight of the nine registered students showed up, and one of the Entrepreneurial Journalism students joined us. Overall, I’d give execution a “good.” We covered a fair bit of material but, as survey responses attest, the students are ready to move from theoretical to practical. We also ran out of time in a serious way. Recapping thoughts on the session, then class notes at the end. Continue reading “Class: Blogging Best Practices, 4/25/11”

Class: Blogging Best Practices, 4/11/11

Better way late than never on this one, I suppose. Monday night was the first of three editions for Blogging Best Practices. All nine students showed up. It went surprisingly well, especially considering I had only a nebulous idea of what I wanted to teach on Friday and 45 minutes to prepare the actual lesson before class. I suspect it illustrates the importance of knowing your material. Monday’s busyness continued through the week, but I’d like to nail down a few thoughts while they’re still lukewarm in my memory. The class notes are at the end of the post.

Continue reading “Class: Blogging Best Practices, 4/11/11”

What should I teach for Blogging Best Practices?

For the next three of four Monday evenings, I’m teaching Blogging Best Practices as a part of the continuing education series produced by the J-School and Baruch College. The total class time is six hours. Here’s its description:

Anyone can create a blog, but what does it mean to blog well? This course will teach you how to set up and design your blog, how to get traffic, how to handle conversations, and how to make money.

Useful, right? The short of it: I have plenty of fodder for what I can teach, everything from the ethic of the link to basic HTML/CSS for formatting, but what I should teach is the more important question.

What’s one thing about blogging you’ve learned and can teach? Or, what’s one thing you still want to learn? Topics, teaching strategies and exercise ideas greatly appreciated.