Post-Mortems at HubSpot: What I Learned From 250 Whys

Post-Mortems at HubSpot: What I Learned From 250 Whys:

This is a somewhat specific detail, but it comes up a lot, so I wanted to pull it out. If you run a bunch of 5 Whys, you’ll find that a lot of times, the developer who made the first-order mistake (forgot to copy configs from QA to Prod, or deployed two apps out of order, or whatever), will say “Look, this was totally my fault, I screwed up, that’s the whole story. I’ll be more careful next time.”

The very short summary of which is: We’re going to fix this problem by being less stupid in the future.

Which, well, you can guess how that’s going to turn out.

Why do some developers at strong companies like Google consider Agile development to be nonsense?

Why do some developers at strong companies like Google consider Agile development to be nonsense? Most points resonate — particularly this one:

10. Simplicity–the art of maximizing the amount of work not done–is essential. – Most teams simply don’t spend enough time on this. A sense of urgency often overrides careful planning. The problem here is careful planning makes things get done faster. During the planning stage it feels like you’re not getting anywhere, but you are setting up for a quick sprint. This setup is often overlooked, and we end up with not only complicated software, but complicated development habits, complicated code, and generally poor software design. This slows down maintenance and new development, as we try to fit into poorly designed structures that become ingrained and impossible to improve.

Malcolm events

Management is the care and feeding of the invisible. You’re doing your best when it appears the least is happening. I love the thrill of the last month of a release as much of the next guy, but I suspect the reason we’re yelling at each other, working weekends, and feeling the depressing weight of compromise is because we’re surrounded by Malcolm events [, seemingly insignificant events that are intent on screwing you in an unlikely way.]

Michael Lopp — Managing Humans